How to Store LDS Quotes

Study Topics

Quotation marks

How do you store all the awesome LDS quotes * you find from conference talks or other books? Some people copy them into a Word doc or Evernote but there’s a much better way to do it and associate those statements with the scriptures using Scripture Notes.

In a previous post I discussed how to store General Conference notes in Scripture Notes. In this article, I’m going to show you a couple techniques for storing short or lengthy quotes in a way that makes them easy to retrieve.

Storing LDS quotes from General Conference

Lets start with a statement from President Russell M. Nelson’s opening remarks at the April 2020 General Conference.

The purpose of this and every general conference is to help us to hear Him. We have prayed, and invite you to pray, that the Spirit of the Lord will be with us in such rich abundance that you can hear the messages that the Savior has especially for you—messages that will bring peace to your soul. Messages that will heal your broken heart. Messages that will illuminate your mind. Messages that will help you know what to do as you move ahead through times of turmoil and trial.

What do you do with a quote like this? You might start by asking the question, why do we have a general conference meeting?

The answer is in the scriptures. Do a search in Scripture Notes for:

Conference*

With the wildcard ending, it will result in 1 verse in the New Testament (which you can remove as irrelevant from your results) and 27 verses in the Doctrine & Covenants. You would then create a collection note from the search result verses and in the master note, put the quote from President Nelson.

How to store LDS quotes

A quick word about citations – I’m not picky about how I cite things. I’m not writing a manuscript. I want to know my sources and how to get back to them, but I don’t feel the need to worry about a certain style of referencing material. For the quote above, I would put this at the end of the quote: “- Russell M. Nelson, April 2020 GC, Opening Message.” I might then add a link to the talk as well, but it’s not necessary for me since I know how to always get back and find this. If it was a lesser known source, or something I felt might even disappear, I would be more precise about it and more heavily consider putting a web link into my note and other reference material as I determine.

Also, when storing a quote it’s appropriate to put “double quote marks” around the quote. I don’t always do that in articles on this site because WordPress has a quote feature that specifically sets the quote apart in its own box design so for style purposes I generally leave them off because it’s obvious it’s a quote.

Now you want to give yourself plenty of ways to retrieve this note. You are already associating the statement with all the verses that talk about conferences, so any time you see one of those verses, you’ll also be able to find this quote. Now you want to now make the title and tags things that will help you remember it.

You can title it “President Nelson on the purpose of General Conferences.” Or, if you want to gather other statements about conferences, you would leave it more generic like “The purpose of General Conferences” and then you would look for additional statements to add to your master note.

For tags you would begin by putting “General Conference” and then consider other words you might look up like “Meetings.”

In the categories drop down you would select “Quotes” so in future searches you can limit your search results to only find collection notes marked as containing such quotes.

Now depending on the quote you are storing, you might consider doing other searches and adding in other verses related to the subject.

Storing other LDS quotes and excerpts

What if you are searching for a statement from another source outside of a conference talk? Maybe you’re reading a book and see an inspiring use of words that resonates with your soul and you want to preserve it. In this instance, you can do something similar but slightly different than what’s showed above.

If a statement references a verse, it’s a good idea to consider putting the text right into the verse note for that verse. That way, you always see what it’s associated with.

If it contains more topical information, then it might be a better idea to store it in a master collection note for multiple verses (or no verses if it doesn’t relate to something you can easily link to).

For example, while looking for LDS quotes on a particular topic, you might find a treasure trove of quotes pertaining to food storage. Here’s one I stumbled upon from Latterdaymommy.com. You could create a new collection note titled “Food Storage and Preparedness Quotes” and then tag it “Food Storage” and “Preparedness” and select “Quotes” in the category dropdown.

Personally, I don’t need a massive list on this topic, but I might read through them and grab anything unique which doesn’t replicate another statement. I don’t need two or more of the same thing being said, but if two similar quotes each contain something of value to me in different ways, I’ll store both of them. Just copy/paste the references into your master note and you can save the collection for future reference.

Quotes within Quotes

Another related page I found was an article on “Faith and Food” by Brittany Chapman Nash, Reference Librarian, and Alan Morrell, Curator, at the Church History Museum with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

This had an interesting historical look at the transition from big Sunday dinners, to more modest and simple meals that wouldn’t create a problem for moms trying to get to church and make sure something was on the table to eat after the meeting.

Mary Isabella Horne, Eliza R. Snow, and others began a Ladies’ Cooperative Retrenchment Association in 1870 to popularize simple meals, particularly when hosting guests, and declared “any table neatly spread, with no matter how plain, but wholesome, food, shall be considered fashionable.” At the close of this meeting, they enjoyed a meal of “good bread and butter, with stewed dried apples, one kind of cake, blanc-mange, with cream and preserves, and cold water.”

In this case, if I quote a statement which in turn contains a quote, the appropriate action if I were publishing something would be to put double quote marks around the entire statement and change the double-quote marks within the statement to single quote marks. I would also copy/paste the url for this statement into my master collection note, and use their footnote at the end of this statement so my collection note would look like this:

“Mary Isabella Horne, Eliza R. Snow, and others began a Ladies’ Cooperative Retrenchment Association in 1870 to popularize simple meals, particularly when hosting guests, and declared ‘any table neatly spread, with no matter how plain, but wholesome, food, shall be considered fashionable.’ At the close of this meeting, they enjoyed a meal of ‘good bread and butter, with stewed dried apples, one kind of cake, blanc-mange, with cream and preserves, and cold water.'” – “Minutes of Ladies’ Co-operative Retrenchment Meeting,” Deseret Evening News, Feb. 16, 1870. (from Faith and Food @ https://history.churchofjesuschrist.org/blog/faith-and-food?lang=eng#2)

You can store these as you choose but I’m just demonstrating how I would do it.

Finding LDS Quotes You Store

Now that you’ve stored the quotes, how do you find them later? Scripture Notes gives you a few methods to locate your saved content.

First, you can open the Collection Note pane and search for titles. If you put “Conference” in a title, you search for that and see what you find.

Second, you can search the tag tree for possible tags you’ve stored it under. The more tags you can use for a statement, the more opportunities you’ll have to recall a word that deals with the topic and try to locate it.

Third, as mentioned above, you can do searches in the master collection notes and select the quote category to filter the results by so you only find LDS quotes that have been stored that way.

Try it out now

Dive in and save some quotes so you get familiar with the technique. If you don’t have a Scripture Notes account, sign up for one now and get started.

  • (LDS is a commonly use abbreviation for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints). This article uses the abbreviation for search engine purposes but anyone can use Scripture Notes to save quotes you find regardless of religious beliefs.)

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God, family, country, scriptures, soccer, Sanderson, disc golf, dessert, development. These are a few of my favorite things. :) - Oak Norton

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